Source | LinkedIn : By Chunka Mui

Baloney” and “nonsense” captured the zeitgeist of many reactions to my early articles on the potential of Google’s self-driving car program. But, that was in 2013, when many viewed driverless cars as nothing more than a high-tech dalliance by Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin.

While many technical, business and regulatory issues remain, Google’s efforts have sparked a global arms race to develop autonomous driving technology.  As one auto industry executive recently told me:

None of us would be paying this kind of attention to autonomous driving if Google had not made the progress that it did, and scared us into believing that it might make even more.

A host of industry leaders, adjacency aspirants and new entrants in both the automotive and high technology ecosystems are now engaged in a high-stakes race to enable (and dominate) a driverless car future.

The automotive industry views driverless cars as the evolution of cars leveraging computers. The computer industry views driverless cars as computers with wheels. Both perspectives are right. Success and dominance will depend on which point of view is more useful.

Likewise, the potential viability of driverless cars has captured the imagination and attention of a wide range of stakeholders who might be helped or hurt by the massive societal, economic and competitive ramifications of driverless cars.

To facilitate an ongoing discussion (and help to address search engine limitations), this post will provide an ongoing, chronological compendium of my articles on the business and societal innovation and disruption enabled by driverless cars. Happy reading, and I’d welcome your comments.

Read On…

Advertisements