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3 Reasons To Consider Returning To A Former Employer

Source | FastCompany : By Vicki Salemi

If you feel like your job search has hit a plateau, it may be time to switch things up and try a new strategy. What if I told you that returning to your old stomping grounds is the most effective way to land your next job? Would you consider it?

According to a recent Monster poll, nearly 30% of respondents have already boomeranged back to their former employer. And 51% said they haven’t done it yet but would consider it.

They’re certainly onto something. As a former corporate recruiter, I can assure you this strategy is a big win-win for job seekers and recruiters.

I know what you’re thinking: “I left for a reason. Why go back?” Perhaps you exited because of an uncompetitive salary or a horrible boss—but keep in mind that these things can change. Maybe the company has re-examined its compensation structure since you left; maybe the new leadership emphasizes teamwork. Once you read these three benefits of applying to rejoin your previous employer, you may well find yourself on the boomerang bandwagon.

1. Your Odds Of Getting Hired Back Are Pretty Good

For starters, you’re much more likely to be considered for a job with an old employer than if you simply send your resume into the void. In the past five years alone, 85% of HR professionals say they have received job applications from former employees, and 40% say they hired about half of those former employees who applied, according to research by The Workforce Institute and WorkplaceTrends.com.

That jibes with my own experiences as a recruiter and coach: Candidates I know who reapplied to a previous employer were nearly automatically considered and immediately put to the top of the pile. Plus, their hiring process was expedited as well. (Unless, of course, they left for poor performance. Then it’s the rejection pile!)

Read On…

 

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