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5 Resume Principles

Source | LinkedIn : By Rohan Rajiv

The CV or resume has been pronounced dead many times over. Yet, they’re still around and are what many recruiters and hiring managers ask for. So, if you’re working on your resume, here’s what I’ve learnt about the 5 principles that great resumes follow.


1. No typos and obvious grammatical errors. People spend 30 seconds on your resume, 60 seconds if you are lucky. They expect you have spent significant time on your resume as it is a one page representation of you as a professional. Typos really muck with your chances – especially in a day and age when Word will do it automatically for you.

2. Consistency. Everything on the resume needs to be consistent with what came before. Formatting is the obvious candidate here. Fonts and font sizes need to be the same. If titles or locations are italicized or laid out in a certain format (e.g. State, Country), all titles and locations need to follow suit.

Also, I recommend minimizing format experiments – I am biased toward letting the content stand out.

3. Space use and section split. This advice is focused on the 1 page resume. There are a few things to keep in mind with regards to space –

  • First, the resume shouldn’t look empty. Lots of white spaces or really large font gives the impression that you haven’t done much. The best way to write a resume is to put relevant achievements to fill 1.5 pages and then remove the less important ones. A font like Arial or Calibri with a font size of 10 is ideal if you have 3-4 years of work experience. Use margins between moderate and narrow.
  • Next, the typical sections are some form of Work Experience, Education and Additional Info. Very roughly, the split of these sections (and what is in them) should be representative of the time you spend on them. So, if you have done your Masters somewhere and worked for 8 years, you’d imagine that work would be 50% of the resume, education around 20% and additional info around 20% with 10% of white space on the top and bottom. It is odd if you are more additional info over work experience, for example.
  • This applies even within work experience. It is very odd if a job where you spent 1 year has 6 bullets when you’ve only written one for a place where you spent 3 years of your life (I’ve seen many such examples). It is okay to add an extra bullet or two for the most relevant experiences. But, don’t overdo it.
  • Finally, it is okay to have extra-curricular activities listed under work but I wouldn’t go beyond a bullet. Use the space to describe your skills.

4. Skills relevant for the job. There are folks who advise people to create different resumes for different companies. I don’t really like doing that. But, if it works for you, go for it. The implicit principle they point to is to tailor your skills to the job at hand. And, that’s important. There are two steps here.

Read on….

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