Advertisements
General

IB Physics – 7 Ways to Get a 7

[ad_1] IB Physics, especially at the Higher Level, is one of the most difficult subjects in the IB Diploma. Nonetheless, it is still very possible to attain a 7. In fact, according to the IB Statistical Report in November 2009, 31% of Standard Level Candidates and 20% of Higher Level Candidates received a 7. This means that on average, in a class of 20 HL students, 4 will get a 7.

So how do you get into that top 20%?

To find out, I’ve asked many successful past IB Physics students regarding their techniques, as well as IB Physics teachers, one of whom used to mark IB Papers. Combining this with my own experiences, I’ve found 7 key things that successful students are doing in terms of learning the course and IB Revision.

1) Know Your IB Physics Syllabus

One of the best aspects of IB Science subjects is the Syllabus. The Syllabus contains all the possible concepts that could possibly be examined. I know a teacher who actually writes IB Papers and he told me that every question that is written is closely checked according to the Syllabus and if it’s not relevant, it is removed. This means that if you can do every point in the Syllabus, then there is nothing that can surprise you in your final examination. So if you still have plenty of time before your final exams, make sure you have you syllabus next to you as you revise.

2) Annotate Your IB Physics Syllabus

We can go one step further. What I strongly recommend is printing out a copy of all of the relevant sections of the Syllabus. As you learn/revise, don’t just write down notes in your notebook, write your notes on your printed version of the syllabus! That way, as you learn, you’re cross-referencing to your syllabus. When you do this, you’ll be well aware of all the topics you’ve covered, the topics you’ve missed and importantly, the topics that you’re not yet familiar with.

3) Maximize Your IB Physics Internal Assessment (IA) Scores

Whilst the IB Physics exam may be difficult, the Internal Assessment is much easier. This is…

[ad_2]
Sourced from by Owen Yang

Advertisements
Tags
Show More

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Back to top button
Close