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The Top Five HR Trends For 2017

Source | FastCompany : By STEFFEN MAIER

HR leaders are sizing up a handful of challenges that they weren’t yet facing in the early days of 2016. Over the next 12 months the solutions to those obstacles will have to evolve and adapt as the overall business world does the same. Still, it’s worth taking a look back at what’s changed in the past year in order to see what’s in store for human resources professionals in 2017. These are five of the biggest trends impacting the field right now.

1. MILLENNIALS ARE NO LONGER THE NEWBIES

All the fuss and bother over the past few years about integrating millennials into the workplace is officially outdated. It’s now time to welcome in the next generation. In 2017, the oldest members of generation Z will be turning 21–23 (there’s some debate as to whether the new generation begins in 1994 or 1996). In the meantime, those on the older end of the millennial spectrum are already in their mid-30s. Many have been in the workforce for over a decade, having served as managers, VPs, startup founders, and CEOs for quite some time.

Gen Zers, on the other hand, are now just starting to enter the workforce as interns and even entry-level employees. This will present new challenges for HR leaders looking to figure out how (and even whether) this new generation brings something fundamentally different to the workplace, and what it may take to prepare millennials to lead them.

2. CULTURE AND ETHICS GET A MUCH-NEEDED REFRESH

A string of ugly scandals in recent years has hit companies like Zenefits, Wells Fargo, ANZ Bank, Mitsubishi, Volkswagen, Toshiba, and others. What they have in common is that all have been attributed, in one way or another, to a toxic work culture where unethical business practices were encouraged. In most cases, impossibly high standards set by executives and upper management led employees to cut corners (or worse) to reach them.

A combined Columbia and Duke University study found that an emphasis on figures over people can encourage unethical behavior—a finding that should surprise no one. As Shiva Rajgopal of Columbia University explained, “Our research provides systematic evidence—perhaps for the first time—that effective cultures are less likely to be associated with “short-termism,” unethical behavior, or earnings management to pad quarterly earnings.”

Read On….

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