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Workplace Ethics: Say No To Laziness

[ad_1] As I was reading the Bible sometime this week my eyes fell on a verse that set my heart pumping hard. My lips went dry as I tried to ruminate over

what I had just read.

The words in Proverbs 18:9 were very clear in my mind:

“He who is slack in his work is a brother to him who destroys.”

(Slack means not willing to work/lazy/not work well/slothful)

These are the very words in the verse that I read. (My aim is not to preach here but to give you insights of how we should conduct ourselves at the workplace to maximize what we have worked for so hard).

The words hit me like a thunderbolt. Why? Well, I have been guilty of being slack in my work sometimes. I know you have too. The writing on the wall is clear: if you are lazy or slothful then there is no difference between you and a person who destroys or wastes.

The more we ‘encourage’ ourselves to be slack and lazy by camouflaging this stark reality in well-meaning words and clichés such as ‘relaxing’, ‘all work with no play makes Jack a dull boy’, and ‘entertainment’ then we’re distancing ourselves from the brass tacks of the game. Therefore, the first high wind that comes will destroy our ship. A ship that has, maybe, taken years of toil and soil to build.

People who are slack will generally find that they have so much time on their hands to do other things but the work they ought to plan for and do. They are time wasters. We must never forget that time is one of the most priceless things that all people possess in equal measure. What sets people apart is how they utilize the time they have.

How do you use your time? How do you use your working time? Do you steal time from your employer? (This gives laziness a ‘legal’ hold on us). Do you always give flimsy reasons for not achieving what is expected of you? If so, outline the reasons and try to find out why you give those reasons. You’ll be surprised at how some of these reasons are puerile.

Our vision is clear in our minds. We want to achieve a higher high and sharpen…

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Sourced from by Richard Mbuthia

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